New X-Ray Method For Coronavirus Diagnosis Ready for Testing

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Conventional chest x-ray Image: Franz Pfeiffer / TUM

New x-ray method for Corona diagnosis ready for patient testing

Technical University of Munich/research news

Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed an innovative x-ray method for lung diagnostics, which they now plan to test in one of its first applications for diagnosis of the respiratory ailment Covid-19 caused by Coronavirus. The method could clearly identify abnormalities typical of the illness and involves a significantly lower radiation dose than the computed tomography methods currently in use. Last week, the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) issued the approval necessary for the tests.

Reliable methods for identifying the new Coronavirus are crucial during the pandemic it has caused. In addition to biochemical tests, x-ray methods can also be used to identify pathological changes in the lung that can typically accompany Covid-19. These x-ray methods make it possible to examine large numbers of patients within a very short time, providing results immediately after the examination.Deflected x-rays exposes areas with damaged pulmonary alveoliWorking together with colleagues from the university hospital TUM Klinikum rechts der Isar, Franz Pfeiffer, Professor for Biomedical Physics and Director of TUM’s Munich School of BioEngnieering, now plans to test the new dark-field x-ray imaging procedure in the diagnosis of Covid-19.Read More:

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1 COMMENT

  1. This is very interesting not only cutting down radiation but throughput as well. We have to decontaminate the CT room after use by infected patients, this could speed things up considerably. I’m passing this on to my Radiology group.

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